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Tan Zhongyi vs Ju Wenjun, Game 9 and Photos: Women's World Chess Championship, Shanghai-Chongqing 2018

Tan Zhongyi and Ju Wenjun, Game 9 of the Women's World Chess Championship Match 2018
Tan Zhongyi and Ju Wenjun, Game 9 of the Women's World Chess Championship Match 2018. Photos by Gu Xiaobing









Move
   

Tan, Zhongyi (2522) - Ju, Wenjun (2571) [E37]
Women's World Championship/Chongqing (9) 2018

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 The Nimzo-Indian Defence. 4. Qc2 d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Qxc3 Ne4 7. Qc2 c5 8. dxc5 Nc6 9. Nf3 Qa5+ 10. Bd2 Nxd2 11. Qxd2 Another continuation is 11.Nxd2. dxc4 12. Qxa5 Nxa5 13. e3 b5! A strong move. Black has good counterplay. 14. cxb6 axb6! A novelty. In the game Benes, M, - Malinovsky, Brno Trade op 2010, Black played the risky 14...Bb7. 15. Nd2 b5 15...Ba6!? is interesting. 16. a4 Nb7 17. Ra3 Rxa4 18. Rxa4 bxa4 19. Bxc4 Bd7 20. Ne4?! White tries to play for a win, but this is a dubious move. 20.b3 is better, with equality. Ke7 21. Ke2 Rb8! Black pressures on the b2-pawn to take the initiative and so has a small advantage. White must defend. 22. Rb1 Bc6 23. Nc3 Nc5 24. f3 f5 24...Rb4!? deserves attention. 25. Kd2 g5! Now Black attacks on the kingside. 26. Be2 h5! 27. Kc2 g4 28. Rd1 Rg8 29. Rd4! White counterattacks. gxf3?! 29...Nd7! is more precise. 30. Bxf3 Bxf3 31. gxf3 Rg2+ 32. Rd2 Rg1 33. Rd4?! 33.Rd1= is better, and the second player cannot grab a pawn. Rf1 34. Nxa4 e5 35. Rh4 Rf2+ 36. Kd1 Nxa4 37. Rxa4 Rxf3 Black wins a pawn. 38. Ke2 Rh3 39. Ra6 Rxh2+ Ju Wenjun obtains a clear advantage and tries to win. 40. Kf3 Rh3+ 40...h4! is better. 41. Kf2 Rh2+ 42. Kg3 Re2 43. Kf3 Rxb2 44. Rh6 Rh2 45. e4! The only move. Tan Zhongyi defends well. Rh4 46. exf5 Rf4+ 47. Ke3 Rxf5 48. Ke4 Rg5 49. Ra6 Kf7 50. Ra7+ Kg6 51. Ra6+ Kg7 52. Ra7+ Kh6 53. Ra8 Rg7 54. Kxe5 Kg5 55. Ke4 Kg4 56. Ke3 Kg3 57. Ke2 The endgame is drawn. Kg2 58. Rh8 Re7+ 59. Kd2 Re5 60. Rg8+ Kh3 61. Rg7 h4 62. Rg8 Kh2 63. Rg4 h3 64. Rg8 Re6 65. Rg7 Re8 66. Rg6 Ra8 67. Ke2 Ra2+ 68. Kf1 Rg2 69. Rf6 Rg5 70. Rf2+ Kh1 71. Rf6 Rg1+ 72. Kf2 Rg2+ 73. Kf1 h2 74. Rf8 Rg1+ 75. Kf2 Rg2+ 76. Kf1 Ra2 77. Rf7 Ra1+ 78. Kf2 Ra2+ 79. Kf1 Ra1+ 80. Kf2 Ra2+ 1/2-1/2


Chief Arbiter Anastasia Sorokina and Tan Zhongyi before Game 9
Chief Arbiter Anastasia Sorokina and Tan Zhongyi.

Ju Wenjun relaxes and concentrates before the game. Women's World Chess Championship Match, Chongqing 2018
Ju Wenjun relaxes and concentrates before the game. Women's World Chess Championship Match, Chongqing 2018.

A sharp fight! Tan Zhongyi and Ju Wenjun
A sharp fight! Tan Zhongyi and Ju Wenjun, Game 9. Women's World Chess Championship 2018. Photos by Gu Xiaobing


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