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Tan Zhongyi (2502) - Dronavalli Harika (2539) [E54]
Women's World Chess Championship KO, Tehran (5.1) 2017

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. d4 e6 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 Bb4
The Nimzo-Indian Defence.
4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 c5 6. Nf3 d5 7. O-O cxd4 8. exd4 dxc4 9. Bxc4 b6 10. Bg5 Bb7 11. Qe2








   
11...Bxc3
A popular line in this opening. The alternative is 11...Nbd7.
12. bxc3 Nbd7 13. Bd3 Qc7 14. Rac1 Ng4








   
15. Be4
Black threatens with 15...Bxf3 and 16...Qxh2 checkmate, and White trades the light-squared bishop to defend.
15...Rfe8
A rare continuation. Usually Black plays 15...Bxe4 immediately, e.g. 16. Qxe4 Ngf6 17. Qe2 Rac8 18. c4 h6 19. Bh4 Qf4?! (19...Qb7 20. Rfe1 Rfe8 21. a4 Qa6 (21...Nh5=) 22. Qa2 Rc6=, with equality in Radjabov, T - Kramnik, V, London Candidates 2013; 19...Qc6!? is interesting, 20. Qd1 Rfe8 (20...Ne4 =) 21. Re1?! (21. Bg3 Ne4 22. Bf4=) 21...Ne4! 22. Ne5 Nxe5 23. dxe5 Ng5 (23...Nc5!? 24. Bf6 Nd7 25. Qg4 Nxf6 26. exf6 g6 27. Qf4 Kh7 28. h4 Rc7) 24. Bxg5 hxg5 25. Rc3 Red8 (25...Qc5!?) 26. Qh5 Rd4 27. Qxg5 Rxc4 28. Rg3 g6 29. h4 Rc1 30. Rge3=, with equality in the endgame, Cruz ,C - Van Wely, L, Linares 2013) 20. Rfe1 Rfd8?! (20...Nh5) 21. Rc3 (21. h3!?) 21...Nf8 (21...Qf5) 22. Rb3 N8d7 (22...Qd6) 23. Bg3 Qf5 24. Ra3 (24. Rb5) 24...Ra8 25. Ne5 (25. h3) 25...Nxe5 26. Bxe5 Nd7?! (26...Ng4) 27. Rf3 Qh5? (27...Qh7) and Dronavalli Harika wins with 28. Bxg7! Kh7 29. Bxh6! 1-0 Harika, Dronavalli - Maric, A, Dresden 2008. 18...Qb7 leads to the game Speelman, J - Polugaevsky, L, Netherlands 1992: 19. Rfe1 Rfe8 20. h3 Qa6 21. Ne5.









   
16. h3
16. Rfe1 Bxe4 17. Qxe4 Ngf6 is also possible, 18. Qe2 Rac8 (18...Nd5?! is worse, 19. c4 Nf4 20. Qe4 Ng6 21. h4 h6 22. h5 Ngf8 23. Bf4 Qd8, with a small edge to White in Sigurjonsson, G - Barcza, G, Caracas 1970) 19. c4 h6 20. Bh4 (or 20. Bd2 Qc6 (20...Nf8) 21. Qd3 a6 22. h3 b5 23. cxb5 (23. c5!?) 23...Qxb5 24. Qxb5 axb5= 25. Rb1 Rc2 26. Rxb5 Ra8 27. Ra1 Raxa2 28. Rxa2 Rxa2 29. Rb7 1/2, a draw in Karpov, A - Van Wely, L, Wijk aan Zee 1998) 20...Qf4?! is a dubious move, 21. Qd3 (21. Bg3!?) 21...Nh5 22. Qa3 Rc7 (22...g5 23. Bg3 Nxg3 24. hxg3 Qc7, with a small advantage to the first player) 23. Be7 Rc6, and White had a small edge in Wang, P - Sundararajan, K, Philadelphia 2011.
But 20...Qd6!? is interesting, 21. Qb2 Nh5 22. Qb5 f5 (22...Ndf6!?=) 23. Bg3 Nxg3 24. hxg3 Nf6 1/2, a draw in Meskovs, N - Starostits, I, Riga 2014. 20...Nh5!? also deserves attention. White could try 16. Bf4!?.
16...Bxe4 17. Qxe4 Ngf6 18. Qe2 Rac8 19. c4 Qb7
Black could try 19...e5!?.
20. Rfe1 Qa6 21. Ne5 Nxe5 22. dxe5
22. Qxe5 is also playable, but White prefers to attack on the kingside, in this case the text is more logical.
22...Nd7 23. Qg4 Kh8








   
24. Qh5
Here White can play 24. Re4!? at once. After 24. Qf4 Kg8 25. h4 (25. Qg4) 25...Rc5= 26. Qg3 Kf8? (26...Kh8= is better) 27. Qd3, White grabs a pawn and has a big advantage, 27...Qc8 28. Qxh7 f6 29. exf6 (29. Bh6 gxh6 30. Re3, winning) 29...Nxf6 30. Bxf6 gxf6 31. Rc3, and White attacks the king and wins, 31...Qc7 32. Qh8+ Kf7 33. Qh6 Rg8 34. Rd3 Qc6 35. g3 Rg6 36. Qd2 Rxc4 37. Rd7+ Kg8 38. Rxa7 Qd5 39. Qxd5 1-0, Speelman, J - Polugaevsky, L, Netherlands 1992.
24...Kg8 25. Qg4 Kh8 26. Re4!?
A novelty. White intends to pressure on the kingside with rooks. 26. Qf4 leads to the game Speelman, J - Polugaevsky, L, Netherlands 1992.









   
26...Qa3?!
A dubious move. Black can play 26...Rc5 or 26...Qxa2 27. Qd1 (27. Rd1 Nf8 28. h4 h6 29. Bf6 gxf6 30. exf6 Ng6 31. h5 Rg8 32. hxg6 Rxg6 33. Qf3) 27...Nc5 28. Rf4 Qb2 29. Rxf7 Rf8 30. Rxf8+ Rxf8 31. Bf4 Kg8 32. Rb1 Qc3 33. Rc1 Qb2.
27. Rd1 Nf8?!
27...Rc7 is stronger, 28. Qf4 Qf8 (28...Qc5 29. h4) 29. Qg3, with a small advantage to White.
28. h4!
White launches an attack on Black's king.
28...Qc3
Or 28...h6 29. Qh5 Nh7 30. Bc1 Qe7 31. Red4, and White is better.
29. h5
29. Qf4 is good too.
29...h6 30. Bh4 Rc7 31. Red4
White has a clear advantage.
31...Qc2?!
31...Nh7 is more stubborn.









   
32. R1d3!
White activates the second rook.
32...Rc5 33. Rg3
Or 33. Kh2 Rxe5 (33...Nh7 34. Rg3) 34. Rd8, winning.
33...Qh7 34. Rf4
After 34. Qf3 Qf5 35. Rf4 Qxe5 White sacrifices a rook with 36. Rxg7!, winning.
34...Rc7 35. Qf3 Nd7 36. Qe2!








   
36...Rf8
White also wins and after 36...Nf8 37. Qe3 Rec8 38. Bf6! gxf6 39. Rxf6 Qb1+ 40. Kh2 Nh7 41. Qxh6 Rg8 42. Rxg8+ Kxg8 43. Rf3 Kh8 44. Rg3 f6 45. exf6 Qf5 46. Rg7.
37. Be7 Rg8 38. Bd6
38. Rxf7 is good too.
38...Rcc8 39. Rxf7
Winning.
39...Qb1+ 40. Kh2 Nc5 41. Qe3! Qh7 42. Rg6! a5 43. Be7 Rc7








   
44. Rxh6!
A beautiful combination to end the game. After 44. Rxh6 Qxh6 45. Qxh6+ gxh6 46. Bf6+ Rg7 White grabs two rooks after 47. Rxc7 and wins.
Black resigned. 1-0










Move
   

Tan, Zhongyi (2502) - Harika, Dronavalli (2539) [E54]
Women's World Chess Championship KO, Tehran (5.1) 2017

1. d4 e6 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 c5 6. Nf3 d5 7. O-O cxd4 8. exd4 dxc4 9. Bxc4 b6 10. Bg5 Bb7 11. Qe2 Bxc3 12. bxc3 Nbd7 13. Bd3 Qc7 14. Rac1 Ng4 15. Be4 Rfe8 16. h3 Bxe4 17. Qxe4 Ngf6 18. Qe2 Rac8 19. c4 Qb7 20. Rfe1 Qa6 21. Ne5 Nxe5 22. dxe5 Nd7 23. Qg4 Kh8 24. Qh5 Kg8 25. Qg4 Kh8 26. Re4 Qa3 27. Rd1 Nf8 28. h4 Qc3 29. h5 h6 30. Bh4 Rc7 31. Red4 Qc2 32. R1d3 Rc5 33. Rg3 Qh7 34. Rf4 Rc7 35. Qf3 Nd7 36. Qe2 Rf8 37. Be7 Rg8 38. Bd6 Rcc8 39. Rxf7 Qb1+ 40. Kh2 Nc5 41. Qe3 Qh7 42. Rg6 a5 43. Be7 Rc7 44. Rxh6 1-0


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© 2017 Boris Schipkov