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The Sicilian Defence B33, Variation 7.Nd5 Nxd5 8.exd5 Nb8 9.Qf3

by Boris Schipkov

Miettinen, Kristo (2228) - Caire, Francois (2474) [B33]
CP-2007-F-00001, Lechenicher SchachServer 2011

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. e4 c5
The Sicilian Defence.
2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Nb8








   
9. Qf3
A slightly strange move. A bad move according to general principles: White plays the queen too early in the opening. However, White has a plan, intends to attack Black's queenside, the d6 and a7 pawns after Qa3. The logical and brave strategy, best response on such scheme is to develop quickly all pieces in spite of a possible loss of a pawn and attack White's king. Usually White plays 9.c4, e.g. Kasimdzhanov, R - Carlsen, M, Moscow 2007.
9...a6
9...Be7 is also good (see the next game). After these strong continuations 9...a6 and 9...Be7 White must find the best moves to draw.
10. Qa3 Be7 11. Bg5 f6








   
12. Bd2
After 12. Be3 O-O 13. Be2 Black can play the strong 13...f5! 14. f3 (14. f4 Nd7 15. fxe5 f4 16. Bf2 Nxe5 17. Nd4 Bh4 18. O-O Qb6 19. c3 Bg4, with counterplay) 14...f4 15. Bf2 Bf5 16. c4?! (16. O-O-O Nd7 17. Nc3 b5, with counterplay) 16...Nc6! 17. dxc6 axb5 18. Qb3 Qa5+ 19. Kf1 bxc6 (19...Qa4) 20. cxb5+ d5 21. g4 Be6 22. bxc6 Rab8 23. Qc2 e4, with a small edge to Black.
Or 13. O-O-O Bf5!? 14. Nc3 Nd7 15. f3 b5 (15...Qc7, with counterplay) 16. h4 Qb8, with counterplay, Miettinen, K - Ivanov, H, LSS 2008, or 16...Nb6 17. Qa5 Nc4 18. Qxd8 Bxd8, with equality. Also playable is 13...b6 14. h4 Bb7 15. Nc3 f5! 16. h5 (16. f4 Nd7 17. Kb1 Qc7 18. fxe5 Nxe5 19. Qb4 Miettinen, K -Reinhart, K, ICCF email 2009, 19...b5, with counterplay) 16... Nd7 17. Kb1 Qc7 18. f3 Rac8 19. g4 (19. Qb4=) 19...fxg4 20. fxg4, Miettinen,K - Jordan, J, LSS email 2008, 20...Nc5, with equality. Or 14. Kb1 Bb7 15. Nc3 Nd7 16. f4 b5, with counterplay.
12...O-O








   
13. c4
In the case of 13. Bb4 Black can sacrifice the exchange with 13...axb5 14. Qxa8 Na6 15. Bd2 Qc7 16. Qa7 Qxc2 17. Qe3 f5 18. b4 f4 19. Qd3 Qb2 20. Qc3 Qxc3 21. Bxc3 Nc7 22. Rd1 e4 23. Bb2 Bd7 24. Be2 f3 25. gxf3 exf3 26. Bd3 Nxd5 27. Bxh7+ Kxh7 28. Rxd5 Bc6 29. Rd1 Re8 30. O-O Bf8, with nice compensation in the endgame.
Probably 13...Qd7!? is even better (the pawn is poisoned 14.Nxd6? a5 15.Bc5 b6, 14.Bxd6? axb5 15.Qxa8 Qxd6), e.g. 14. c4 b6 15. Nc3?! (15. Bd2=) 15...f5 (15...a5! 16. Nb5 Na6 17. Bd2 f5 18. Be2 Nc5 19. O-O Ba6, with a small edge to Black) 16. Be2 (16. Rc1) 16...Bb7 (16...a5!) 17. Qb3 (17. Na4=) 17...Qc7 18. O-O Nd7, with counterplay in Solleveld, M - Alekseev, E, Santo Domingo 2003. Or 14...b6 15. Bd2?! (15. Kb1 Rd8 16. Bd2 Qb7 17. Nc3=) 15...Qb7! 16. Nc3, Baghdasaryan, V - Arribas Lopez, A, Sibenik 2007, and here 16...b5! is better, 17. Qb4 Bd7, with a small edge to Black, who can attack on the queenside after ...Rc8 and ...a5, or after ...Be8 and ...Nd7.
13...Bg4!
A powerful move! Black develops the light-squared bishop to control d1-h5 diagonal, intends ...f5 to seize the centre and ...Nd7 or ...Nc6 to lead in development.
14. Ba5!
14. Rc1 is worse, 14...f5 15. c5 dxc5 16. d6 Bg5! 17. Bxg5 Qxg5 18. Rc3 Nc6 19. Nc7 Rad8 20. Qxc5 f4! 21. Bxa6 (21. h3 Bd7) 21...bxa6 22. Qxc6 (22. Qd5+ Kh8 23. Rxc6 Rf6) 22...Rf6, Black takes the d6-pawn and has a clear advantage.
14...b6 15. Bb4








   
15...Nd7!
Black sacrifices a pawn, but activates the knight.
16. Bxd6
16. Nxd6? is bad, 16...f5! 17. f3 (17. Nb7 Bxb4+ 18. Qxb4 Qc7 19. c5 bxc5 20. Qb3 Kh8 21. d6 Qc6 22. Na5 Qxd6) 17...Bh5 18. O-O-O a5 19. Bd2 Rb8, and Black is better.
16...Nc5! 17. Bxe7 Qxe7 18. Nc3 e4!
Black has excellent compensation for the pawn: White's king is in the centre, White's queen is on the rim. From the strategical point of view the queen must be in the centre, the king must be on the rim in the middlegame.
19. h3 Bh5








   
20. Na4?
The decisive mistake. Correct is 20. g4! Bg6 21. Na4 f5 22. Nxc5 bxc5 23. O-O-O fxg4 24. d6 Qe5 25. Rd5 Qf4+ 26. Qe3 Qxf2 27. Qxf2 Rxf2 28. hxg4 Rd8 29. g5, with equality.
20...f5!
Black attacks!
21. Nxc5 bxc5 22. g4 fxg4! 23. Be2








   
23...Rf3!!
A beautiful exchange sacrifice.
24. d6
If 24. Bxf3 then 24...exf3+ 25. Qe3 Qxe3+ 26. fxe3 g3 27. O-O Rf8, and Black has a clear advantage due to the strong pawns on the kingside.
24...Qxd6 25. Bxf3 exf3 26. hxg4 Bxg4








   
27. Qe3
And here Black obtains a clear advantage, because has two pawns for the exchange and can attack the white king.
27...Rd8 28. Qe4 Qd2+ 29. Kf1 h6 30. Qe5 Rd4 31. Rh4 Qe2+!
This endgame with the passed e2-pawn is winning for Black.
32. Qxe2 fxe2+ 33. Kg2 g5!








   
34. Rhh1
After 34. Rxh6 Rd3 35. Re1 Kg7 36. Rxa6 Bf3+ 37. Kh2 Rd1 Black wins.
34...Rd3 35. Rhe1 Bf3+ 36. Kh2 g4








   
37. Rac1 Rd1
Black wins after 38. Kg3 Kf7 39. Kf4 (39. b4 cxb4 40. c5 Rxe1 41. Rxe1 Ke6) 39...h5 40. Kg5 Rxc1 41. Rxc1 Ke6 42. Rb1 Ke5.
White resigned. 0-1


Schroeder, Christoph (2212) - Krzyzanowski, Wojciech (2245) [B33]
CP-2010-Q-00004, Lechenicher SchachServer 2012

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Nb8 9. Qf3








   
9...Be7
A simple but strong move. Black plans to sacrifice the a7-pawn to counterattack quickly in the centre with ...f5.
10. Qc3 Na6 11. Be3 O-O 12. Nxa7
White grabs the pawn.
12...Bg5!








   
13. Nb5
After 13. Bxa6 Bxe3 14. Qxe3 (14. fxe3 Rxa7 15. Bd3 Qb6 16. Kf2 f5, with compensation) 14...Qa5+ 15. Qd2 Qxa6 16. Nxc8 Rfxc8 17. a3?! (17. b3 Rc5 (17...b5 18. O-O Qa5 19. Qxa5 Rxa5 20. a4 g5 21. axb5 Rxb5 22. Rfc1 Kg7 23. Kf1 Rc3 24. Ke2 Rxd5=) 18. a4 Rac8 19. c4 b5! 20. cxb5 Rxb5 21. O-O Rxb3=, with equality in Massironi, M - Garano, N, Milan 2009) 17...Qc4 18. c3 Qe4+ 19. Qe2? (19. Kf1 Ra5) 19...Qxg2 20. O-O-O Rc5, Black was better in Ravot, S - Philippe, C, Chartres 2005. Or 15. c3 Qxa6 16. Nxc8 Rfxc8 17. a3 Qb5 18. Qe2 1/2, a draw in Jaeckle, M - Bokelbrink, U, Germany 2006.
13...Bxe3 14. Qxe3 f5
Black has excellent compensation for the pawn.
15. Be2
Or 15. Bc4 Bd7 16. Nc3 f4 17. Qd2 Qh4, Black takes the initiative and can attack on both flanks.
15...f4








   
16. Qd2
16. Qa3?! is weaker, after 16...Rf6! 17. c4 (17. O-O-O Bf5) 17...e4 18. Nd4 Bd7 Black has the better chances and again can attack on both flanks.
16...Nc5 17. O-O
Or 17. Nc3 Bf5 18. O-O Qh4, and Black must crush down White's citadel on the kingside.
17...Rf6! 18. f3








   
18...Rh6
Black attacks on the king's wing like in the game Mezentsev, V - Schipkov, B, Novosibirsk Ch 1988.
19. Qe1!
The only move to defend the position.
19...Qg5
19...Bd7 and 19...Bf5 are interesting too.
20. b4 Qh5 21. h4 Na4 22. c4
Also possible is 22. Nc7 Rb8, with equality.
22...Qg6 23. Qf2 Bh3








   
24. Bd1?
The decisive error. 24. Rfe1! is better to defend the kingside with Bf1, 24...Rxh4 25. Bf1 Rh5 26. Nxd6 Qxd6 (26...Bxg2 27. Bxg2 Qxd6 28. c5 Qxd5 29. Rad1=) 27. gxh3 Qxb4 28. Rab1 Qe7 29. c5! Nxc5 30. Rec1 Na4 31. Qc2, with equality.
24...Rxh4 25. Nxd6 Bxg2! 26. Qxg2 Qxd6 27. Bxa4 Rxa4 28. Qg5 Rh6 29. c5 Rg6 30. cxd6 Rxg5+ 31. Kf2 Rg6 32. Rfe1 Rxb4 33. Rxe5 Rxd6 34. Rc1 Rb2+ 35. Kf1 h6 36. a4 Kf7








   
37. Rc4
Or 37. Rce1 Rb4, and Black has a clear advantage due to an extra pawn.
37...Rb1+ 38. Kf2 g5 39. Rc7+ Kg6 40. Re6+ Rxe6 41. dxe6 Rb6! 42. e7
Or 42. a5 Rb2+ 43. Kf1 Rb5, winning the rook endgame.
42...Rb2+ 43. Kg1 Kf7 44. e8=Q+ Kxe8 45. Rh7 Rb6 46. Kg2 Kf8 47. Rd7 Kg8 48. Kh3 h5 49. Rd5 Rg6 50. a5 Kh7 51. Rb5 Rg7 52. Kg2 Kg6 53. Rb6+ Kf5 54. Rb5+ Ke6 55. Kf1 Kf6 56. Rb6+ Ke5 57. Rb5+ Kd4 58. Kg2 Kc4 59. Rf5 Rg8 60. Kh3 Kb4 61. Rf7 Rb8 62. Rf5 Ra8 63. Rf7 Rxa5 64. Rxb7+ Kc4 65. Rg7 Kd4 66. Kg2 h4 67. Rd7+ Ke5








   
68. Rg7
Black wins.
68...Kf6 69. Rg8 Ra2+ 70. Kh3 Ra1 71. Kg2 h3+!
After 72. Kxh3 Rg1 Black grabs the f3-pawn to have two passed pawns.
White resigned. 0-1










Move
   

Miettinen, Kristo (2228) - Caire, Francois (2474) [B33]
CP-2007-F-00001/Lechenicher SchachServer 2011

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Nb8 9. Qf3 a6 10. Qa3 Be7 11. Bg5 f6 12. Bd2 O-O 13. c4 Bg4 14. Ba5 b6 15. Bb4 Nd7 16. Bxd6 Nc5 17. Bxe7 Qxe7 18. Nc3 e4 19. h3 Bh5 20. Na4 f5 21. Nxc5 bxc5 22. g4 fxg4 23. Be2 Rf3 24. d6 Qxd6 25. Bxf3 exf3 26. hxg4 Bxg4 27. Qe3 Rd8 28. Qe4 Qd2+ 29. Kf1 h6 30. Qe5 Rd4 31. Rh4 Qe2+ 32. Qxe2 fxe2+ 33. Kg2 g5 34. Rhh1 Rd3 35. Rhe1 Bf3+ 36. Kh2 g4 37. Rac1 Rd1 0-1











Move
   

Schroeder, Christoph (2212) - Krzyzanowski, Wojciech (2245) [B33]
CP-2010-Q-00004/Lechenicher SchachServer 2012

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Nb8 9. Qf3 Be7 10. Qc3 Na6 11. Be3 O-O 12. Nxa7 Bg5 13. Nb5 Bxe3 14. Qxe3 f5 15. Be2 f4 16. Qd2 Nc5 17. O-O Rf6 18. f3 Rh6 19. Qe1 Qg5 20. b4 Qh5 21. h4 Na4 22. c4 Qg6 23. Qf2 Bh3 24. Bd1 Rxh4 25. Nxd6 Bxg2 26. Qxg2 Qxd6 27. Bxa4 Rxa4 28. Qg5 Rh6 29. c5 Rg6 30. cxd6 Rxg5+ 31. Kf2 Rg6 32. Rfe1 Rxb4 33. Rxe5 Rxd6 34. Rc1 Rb2+ 35. Kf1 h6 36. a4 Kf7 37. Rc4 Rb1+ 38. Kf2 g5 39. Rc7+ Kg6 40. Re6+ Rxe6 41. dxe6 Rb6 42. e7 Rb2+ 43. Kg1 Kf7 44. e8=Q+ Kxe8 45. Rh7 Rb6 46. Kg2 Kf8 47. Rd7 Kg8 48. Kh3 h5 49. Rd5 Rg6 50. a5 Kh7 51. Rb5 Rg7 52. Kg2 Kg6 53. Rb6+ Kf5 54. Rb5+ Ke6 55. Kf1 Kf6 56. Rb6+ Ke5 57. Rb5+ Kd4 58. Kg2 Kc4 59. Rf5 Rg8 60. Kh3 Kb4 61. Rf7 Rb8 62. Rf5 Ra8 63. Rf7 Rxa5 64. Rxb7+ Kc4 65. Rg7 Kd4 66. Kg2 h4 67. Rd7+ Ke5 68. Rg7 Kf6 69. Rg8 Ra2+ 70. Kh3 Ra1 71. Kg2 h3+ 0-1


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© 2015 Boris Schipkov