Chess Siberia
Home page News Openings Best players/games Software Donate Video Philosophy Interviews Reviews Literature Music Cinema FIDE Answers Old newspapers Correspondence Chess Downloads Links Chess


You don't agree a draw? OK, I will play as a tiger!

by Boris Schipkov

I played with the famous Russian master Nikolay Monin from St. Petersburg in Kecskemet in 1992. After a trudge from Siberia to Hungary and few long games I was a little tired. Before the game I had offered a draw, but received a polite refusal.
How must we play in the such cases? There are two variations.
First, we play very drawish opening and see how an opponent can break our bastions. Maybe he will make mistakes also.
Second, we play very aggressively and try to mate a rival. He may feel some sadness about his decision. We can entail fast crisis and will not play 4 or 6 hours.
I preferred the second variation.

Schipkov, Boris (2355) - Monin, Nikolay (2405) [E87]
Kecskemet 1992

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6
Before the game I did not know that Monin played the Kings Indian Defence.
5. f3
The Saemisch Variation is a very aggressive system in the Kings Indian.
5...O-O 6. Be3 e5 7. d5 Nh5 8. Qd2 Qh4+ 9. g3! Nxg3 10. Qf2 Nxf1 11. Qxh4 Nxe3








   
12. Qf2!
Weaker is 12. Ke2. In the game Kasparov, G - Seirawan, Y, Barcelona 1989 (1/2, 29) Black obtained good counterplay after (9. Bf2 Qf4 10. Be3 Qh4+ 11. g3 Nxg3 12. Qf2 Nxf1 13. Qxh4 Nxe3) 14. Ke2 Nxc4 15. Rc1 Na6 16. Nd1 Nb6 17. Ne3 Bd7 18. Nh3 f6 19. Nf2 Nc8!.
12...Nxc4 13. Nb5
A novelty. Interesting is 13. Qe2 Nb6 14. h4 h5 15. Nh3 Bxh3 16. Rxh3 Bh6 17. Kf2 Na6 18. Rhh1 Kh7 19. a4 Nc8 20. a5 with an edge to White in Jakobsen, O - Berg, K, Copenhagen open 1991 (1-0, 48). Also possible is 13. b3 Nb6 14. Nge2 f5 15. Qg2 Bd7 16. O-O?!, Freeman, M - Remlinger, L, Philadelphia World open 1991 (0-1, 58). Better is 16. h4.
13...Na6 14. Rc1
More precise is 14. Qe2! Nb6 15. h4 with a clear advantage to White.
14...Bd7!
The strongest answer.
15. b3
Dangerous is 15. Nxc7? Nb4 16. Kf1 (16. Rc3 Rac8 17. a3 Rxc7 18. axb4 Rfc8 19. Qxa7 Bh6) 16... Nd3 17. Qe2 Nxc1 18. Qxc4 Rac8 19. Qxc1 Bf6 with some edge to Black because the knight on c7 is lost.
15...Nb4
After 15... Nc5 16. Qe2 Bh6 17. Rc2 Bxb5 18. bxc4 Bd7 19. h4 Bf4 20. h5 g5 21. Qg2 Nd3+ 22. Ke2 Nc5 23. Nh3 h6 24. Nxf4 exf4 25. Re1 f5 26. exf5 Bxf5 27. Kd1 White stands better. If 27...Bxc2+ then 28. Qxc2 with an attack.
16. Rc3








   
16...Nb6?
The decisive error. Correct was 16... Bxb5 17. bxc4 Bxc4 (17... Bd7 18. h4) 18. Qd2 Bxa2 19. Ra3 a5 20. Rxa2 Nxa2 21. Qxa2 c5 22. dxc6 bxc6 23. Ne2 with some edge to the first player.
17. Nxc7!
Black will win this knight, but in return White will take the b4 knight.
17...Rac8 18. Qd2 Bf6 19. Ne2 Bd8 20. a3 Bxc7 21. axb4 Na8 22. h4!
Beginning the powerful attack on the Black's king.
22...f6 23. f4! Bb6 24. Rxc8 Bxc8








   
25. h5
Winning.
25...g5 26. fxg5 f5 27. exf5 Bxf5 28. g6 Kg7 29. Qg5 Bd8 30. h6+
Black resigned. 1-0










Move
   

Schipkov, Boris (2355) - Monin, Nikolay (2405) [E87]
Kecskemet 1992

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 O-O 6. Be3 e5 7. d5 Nh5 8. Qd2 Qh4+ 9. g3 Nxg3 10. Qf2 Nxf1 11. Qxh4 Nxe3 12. Qf2 Nxc4 13. Nb5 Na6 14. Rc1 Bd7 15. b3 Nb4 16. Rc3 Nb6 17. Nxc7 Rac8 18. Qd2 Bf6 19. Ne2 Bd8 20. a3 Bxc7 21. axb4 Na8 22. h4 f6 23. f4 Bb6 24. Rxc8 Bxc8 25. h5 g5 26. fxg5 f5 27. exf5 Bxf5 28. g6 Kg7 29. Qg5 Bd8 30. h6+ 1-0


Top

© 2000-2003 Boris Schipkov