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Mezentsev, Vladimir - Schipkov, Boris [B33]
Novosibirsk Championship 1988

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. e4 c5
The Sicilian Defence.
2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Nb8 9. c4








   
9...Nd7
Probably simpler is 9...Be7, because after 9...Nd7 Black must study 10.Bd3 and 10.Be3, though after both 9...Be7 and 9...Nd7 Black equalizes.
10. Be2 Be7 11. O-O O-O 12. Be3 a6 13. Nc3 f5 14. f3








   
14...Rf6!?
The most aggressive move: Black intends to attack White's king with ...f4, ...Rh6, followed by ...Qe8-h5. Another good continuation is 14...Bg5!?, e.g. 15. Bf2 Bh4 16. Be3 Bg5 17. Qd2 Bxe3+ 18. Qxe3 a5!? 19. f4 Re8! 20. Bd3 Nc5 21. Bc2 Bd7 22. Kh1 Qf6 23. fxe5 Rxe5 24. Qf2 Rae8!, with nice counterplay for Black in Kasimdzhanov, Rustam - Carlsen, Magnus, World Blitz Championship, Moscow 2007. In that game Magnus Carlsen completely seized the e-file with rooks and gradually outplayed the rival.
15. Qc2
If 15. a4 then 15...f4! 16. Bf2 Rh6 17. Ne4, Roe, P - Gadson, J, Auburn Hills 2003, and here better is 17...Qe8! 18. Kh1 Qh5 19. Bg1 Bh4, Black storms the kingside. After 15. b4!?, Rombaldoni, A - Agnelli , F, Bratto 2004, correct is 15...f4! 16. Bf2 (16. Bd2 Rh6) 16...Rh6 17. g4 (17. c5 Qe8, with counterplay) 17...fxg3 18. hxg3 Qe8 19. Be3 Rh3 20. Kg2 Rxg3+ 21. Kxg3 Qg6+ 22. Kh2 Qh5+, with perpetual check.
15...f4!
In this line Black has two good plans: 1. To attack on the kingside; 2. To play in the centre on the e-file after f4 and ...exf4. Some players do not understand the position after 8...Nb8 and play on the queenside, for example, try to attack the c4-pawn with ...Rc8, and, of course, lose. They play like computers, always calculating many variations. But chess programs can calculate millions of moves for minutes, but human beings cannot. Therefore chess programs with excellent evaluation functions can find the best move, but human beings without understanding of positions cannot.
16. Bf2 Rh6!








   
17. Ne4
Black has serious counterplay after 17. Bd3 Qe8 18. h3 Nf6 19. Bf5 Rh5 (19...b5) 20. Bg4 (20. Bd3 Rh6) 20...Rg5. After 17. Rfd1 Qe8 18. Ne4? (18. Bd3 Qh5 19. h3 Nf6 20. Kf1, with counterplay) 18...Qh5 19. h3 Nf6 20. Kf1 Rg6 21. Nxf6+ gxf6 (21...Bxf6!) 22. Bd3 (22. h4 f5) 22...Rxg2! 23. Kxg2 Bxh3+ 24. Kh2 Kh8 (24...Kf7) 25. Bg6 hxg6 Black wins 26. Qb3 Kg7 27. Bb6 Qh4 28. Rd2 Qg3+ 29. Kh1 Rh8, 0-1, Ledic, T - Ivanovic, B, Vinkovci 1982.
17...Qe8!
Logical.
18. g4
In the case of 18. Kh1 Nf6 19. c5 Nxe4 20. fxe4 Black can storm with pawns 20...g5.
18...fxg3 19. Bxg3
Black has a small advantage after 19. Nxg3 Bg5 20. Nf5 Rf6 21. Bd3 Bf4 22. Bh4 g5 23. Bf2 Qh5 24. Bg3 Qf7.
19...Nf6








   
20. f4?!
Better is 20. Nf2!? b5!? 21. Ng4 Rh5 22. cxb5 axb5 23. Qb3 Qg6 24. Qxb5 Nxg4 25. fxg4 Bxg4 26. Qb7 Re8 27. Bb5 Bg5 28. Rae1 Rc8 29. Bd3 Qe8 30. Bb5 Qe7 31. Qxe7 Bxe7 32. Rc1 Rb8 33. a4, with counterplay. The text somewhat weakens White's kingside.
20...Bf5?!
Here I played quickly (often I was in time trouble, when tried to play perfectly), because I thought that the position was equal. If I would have spent about 20 minutes I could have found the best 20...Bh3! 21. fxe5 (or 21. Rf2 exf4 22. Rxf4 Nxe4 23. Rxe4 Bf5), and Black grabs the exchange 21...Nxe4 22. Qxe4 Bxf1 23. Rxf1 dxe5 24. Kg2 Bd6 25. Bg4, though White has some compensation.
21. Nxf6+ Rxf6 22. Bd3








   
22...Bxd3
22...Qg6!? deserves attention, but after 23. Bxf5 Rxf5 24. Kg2 exf4 25. Rxf4 Rxd5 26. Qxg6 Rd2+ 27. Rf2 Rxf2+ 28. Kxf2 hxg6 29. Rd1 Rd8 30. Kf3 the game is equal.
23. Qxd3 exf4 24. Rxf4 Qg6 25. Qxg6 Rxg6 26. Kh1 Bf6








   
27. Re4 Bxb2
With equality.
28. Rb1 Ba3 29. Rxb7 Bc5 30. Rbe7 Rf8 31. Re8 Rxe8 32. Rxe8+ Kf7 33. Re4 Rf6 34. Kg2








   
34...g5!
Black attacks on king's wing to try to win, but the endgame is drawn.
35. h4! gxh4 36. Rxh4 Kg6 37. Bf4 h5 38. Kf3 Rf8 39. Rh2 Rb8 40. Rg2+ Kf6








   
41. Bg5+
41. Rg5 is more precise, 41...Rb4 42. Rxh5 Rxc4 43. Rh6+ Ke7.
41...Kf7
Black could move the king in the centre 41...Ke5 42. Be3 Rf8+ 43. Ke2 Bxe3 44. Kxe3 Rh8 45. Rg6 h4 46. Re6+ Kf5 47. Kf2 Rf8 48. Kg2 Rf6 49. Re7, though, of course, this is also a draw.
42. Kf4 Rb1 43. Bh4 Rf1+ 44. Kg5 Rc1
Mezentsev and I both beat almost all opponents in the Novosibirsk Championship 1988, but before the last round I had 8.5 points, Vladimir - 8 points out of 10. Since I had the better coefficient I quickly agreed to a draw, Mezentsev fought and won. And I became the Novosibirsk Champion.
45. Rb2 Rxc4 46. Rb7+ Ke8 47. Kxh5 Rb4
A draw. 1/2-1/2










Move
   

Mezentsev, Vladimir - Schipkov, Boris [B33]
Novosibirsk ch 1988

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Nb8 9. c4 Nd7 10. Be2 Be7 11. O-O O-O 12. Be3 a6 13. Nc3 f5 14. f3 Rf6 15. Qc2 f4 16. Bf2 Rh6 17. Ne4 Qe8 18. g4 fxg3 19. Bxg3 Nf6 20. f4 Bf5 21. Nxf6+ Rxf6 22. Bd3 Bxd3 23. Qxd3 exf4 24. Rxf4 Qg6 25. Qxg6 Rxg6 26. Kh1 Bf6 27. Re4 Bxb2 28. Rb1 Ba3 29. Rxb7 Bc5 30. Rbe7 Rf8 31. Re8 Rxe8 32. Rxe8+ Kf7 33. Re4 Rf6 34. Kg2 g5 35. h4 gxh4 36. Rxh4 Kg6 37. Bf4 h5 38. Kf3 Rf8 39. Rh2 Rb8 40. Rg2+ Kf6 41. Bg5+ Kf7 42. Kf4 Rb1 43. Bh4 Rf1+ 44. Kg5 Rc1 45. Rb2 Rxc4 46. Rb7+ Ke8 47. Kxh5 Rb4 1/2-1/2


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© 2013 Boris Schipkov