Chess Siberia
Home page News Openings Best players/games Software Donate Video Philosophy Interviews Reviews Literature Music Cinema FIDE Answers Old newspapers Correspondence Chess Downloads Links Chess


Kramnik, Vladimir (2769) - Morozevich, Alexander (2758) [E04]
World Championship, Mexico City (2) 2007

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. d4 dxc4 5. Bg2 a6 6. Ne5 Bb4+ 7. Nc3 Nd5








   
8. O-O!?
White sacrifices a pawn. This simple but tempting move is a novelty. The common move is 8. Bd2, for example, 8. Bd2 b5 9. O-O Bxc3 10. bxc3 O-O 11. a4 c6 12. Qc2 f6 13. Ng4 Nd7 14. e4 Ne7 with counterplay in Bareev, E - Korotylev, A, Russian Championship (the major league), Krasnoyarsk 2007.
8...O-O
Black could try 8...Nxc3 9. bxc3 Bxc3 10. Rb1 Qxd4 11. Qa4+ b5 12. Qa3 Qxe5 13. Bf4 Qf6 14. Bxc7.
9. Qc2 b5 10. Nxd5 exd5 11. b3 c6 12. e4!?
Also possible is 12. bxc4 bxc4 13. e4.
12...f6








   
13. exd5!!
Now Vladimir Kramnik sacrifices his knight! From the psychologic and practical points of view this is the excellent decision as well as the novelty 8. O-O. In such cases a rival must solve new problems and find the only moves in complex positions what can lead to time trouble and mistakes. Of course, such sacrifices are good only against human beings but not against computer programs.
13...fxe5 14. bxc4 exd4 15. dxc6 Be6
And after 15...Ra7 16. cxb5 Kh8 17. Bf4 Rxf4 18. b6 Qxb6 19. gxf4 White has compensation.
16. cxb5 d3
16...Ra7 and 16...Qa5 are possible too.
17. c7!








   
17...Qd4?
A mistake. White obtains a clear advantage after 17...dxc2?! 18. cxd8=Q Rxd8 19. Bxa8 axb5 20. Be4 Rc8 21. Bf4 Ba3 22. Rae1 Bh3 23. Bc1 Bxf1 24. Kxf1 Bxc1 25. Rxc1. But 17...Qd6!? is better, after 18. Qa4!? Nd7 19. Bxa8 Rxa8 20. Bf4 Qd5 21. Rac1 Bc5 22. Qxa6 Nb6 23. Rxc5 Qxc5 24. Be3 Qxc7 25. Bxb6 Rxa6 26. Bxc7 Rxa2 the ending looks drawish. Even worse is 18. Qb2? Nd7 19. Bxa8 Rxa8 20. Bf4 Qd5! 21. Rac1 Qf3, and Black wins, 22. c8=Q+ Rxc8 23. Rxc8+ Bf8 24. Qd4 Bd5 25. Qxd5+ Qxd5 26. bxa6 Qxa2 27. Rd8 Nc5.
18. Qa4! Nd7 19. Be3 Qd6 20. Bxa8 Rxa8








   
21. Bf4?
Correct is 21. Rac1! Rc8 22. Rc6 Qd5 23. Qxb4 Bh3 24. Qb3, winning.
21...Qf8?
Here Black could pass to the same endgame position as in the case of 17...Qd6!? 18. Qa4!? after the best 21...Qd5! 22. Rac1 (22. Qxb4? Qf3! 23. Qd6 Bd5) 22...Bc5 23. Qxa6 Nb6 24. Rxc5 Qxc5 25. Be3 Qxc7 26. Bxb6 Rxa6 27. Bxc7 Rxa2. Alexander Morozevich was in time trouble.
22. b6!+-








   
22...Ne5
Or 22...Nxb6 and the first player wins with the fork 23. Qc6.
23. Bxe5
Also possible is 23. b7 Nf3+ 24. Kh1 Bd5 25. b8=Q Ne5+ 26. f3.
23...Qf3 24. Qd1!








   
24...Qe4 25. b7 Rf8
25...Qxb7 is met by 26. Qxd3 Bh3 27. f3 Bxf1 28. Rxf1.
26. c8=Q








   
26...Bd5
Two queens.
27. f3
Black resigned. 1-0










Move
   

Kramnik, Vladimir (2769) - Morozevich, Alexander (2758) [E04]
World Championship/Mexico City (2) 2007

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. d4 dxc4 5. Bg2 a6 6. Ne5 Bb4+ 7. Nc3 Nd5 8. O-O O-O 9. Qc2 b5 10. Nxd5 exd5 11. b3 c6 12. e4 f6 13. exd5 fxe5 14. bxc4 exd4 15. dxc6 Be6 16. cxb5 d3 17. c7 Qd4 18. Qa4 Nd7 19. Be3 Qd6 20. Bxa8 Rxa8 21. Bf4 Qf8 22. b6 Ne5 23. Bxe5 Qf3 24. Qd1 Qe4 25. b7 Rf8 26. c8=Q Bd5 27. f3 1-0


Top

© 2000-2007 Boris Schipkov