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Harika, Dronavalli (2521) - Ju, Wenjun (2559) [A42]
Chess Women's Grand Prix, Sharjah (9) 2014

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. d4 d6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 Nc6
Black prefers not to play the usual ...Nf6.
5. Be3 e5 6. d5 Nd4 7. Nge2 Nxe2 8. Bxe2








   
8...h5?!
A risky move. Black plans ...Bh6 or ...Nh6, followed by ...f7-f5. The alternatives are 8...f5 and 8...Nf6.
9. Qd2
Here 9. c5!? is interesting, with the idea to seize the c-line in the future, 9...Bh6 (9...a6 10. Na4?! (10. Qa4+ or 10. O-O) 10...Bh6 11. Qb3 Bxe3 12. Qxe3 Bd7 13. Bd1 Kf8 14. Rc1 Nf6 15. cxd6 cxd6 16. Nb6 Rb8 17. f3 (17. a4) 17...h4 18. O-O Nh5 19. Rf2 Nf4 20. Nxd7+?! (20. Rfc2 is better) 20...Qxd7 21. Qb6 Kg7= Vlaic, B - Begonja,V, Rabac 2004) 10. Qd3!? (10. Bxh6 Nxh6 11. cxd6 (11. Qa4+!?) 11...cxd6 12. Qa4+ Kf8?! (12...Bd7) 13. Qa3 Ke7 (13...a6) 14. Nb5 Qb6?! (14... a6) 15. Rc1 Rd8 16. O-O (16. Qg3) 16...Bd7? (16...Bg4) 17. Rc7! Rdc8? (17...Rab8) 18. Rxb7! Qc5 19. Nxa7 (19. b4) 19...Qxa3 20. Nxc8+ 1-0 Godart, F - Noiroux, K, Belgium 2012) 10...Bxe3 11. Qxe3 Nf6 12. h3 (12. O-O or 12. f4) 12...Qe7 13. cxd6 cxd6 14. Rc1 Bd7 15. O-O O-O, and White had a small advantage in Maljutin, E - Burlov, V, Moscow 1997.
9...Nh6!?
After 9...Bh6 10. O-O Bxe3 11. Qxe3 g5 12. c5! Bd7 13. Rac1! f6 14. c6 (14. Rc2) 14...bxc6 15. dxc6 Bc8 16. Nd5 Kf7 17. Bc4 Kg6 18. h4! Nh6 19. Qg3 Be6 GM Miles launched a devastating attack with 20. f4! Bxd5 21. fxg5 fxg5 (21...Bxc4 22. gxh6+ Kxh6 23. Rxc4) 22. Bxd5 (22. exd5!) 22...Qe7? (22...g4) 23. Rf5! Nxf5 24. exf5+ Kh6 25. f6 1-0 Miles, A - Welling, G, Isle of Man 1995.









   
10. h3!?
White prevents ...Ng4. 10. f3 is also possible, 10...f6 (10...f5) 11. c5 dxc5 12. Bxc5 Nf7 13. Qc2 (13. Be3!?) 13...Nd6 (13...Bh6) 14. Nb5 O-O 15. Nxa7 Bd7 16. Qb3 f5, with counterplay in Nenciulescu, S - Bonoldi, F, LSS email 2009.
10...f5
Or 10...f6 11. O-O-O (the typical 11. c5! is stronger) 11...Nf7 12. f4 (12. c5) 12...Bd7 13. Kb1 Qe7 14. g3 a6 , with counterplay in Niklasson, C- Bednarski, J, Oslo 1976.









   
11. g3?!
11. Bg5! is better, 11...Qd7 (11...Bf6 12. Bxh6 f4 13. Bxf4 exf4 14. Qxf4 O-O 15. Qh6 Qe8 16. O-O) 12. Bd1 f4 (12...Nf7 13. Ba4 c6 14. exf5 gxf5 15. O-O f4 16. Ne4) 13. Bxh6 Rxh6 14. Ba4 c6 15. O-O-O g5 16. g3 Kf8, and White has an advantage.
11...Nf7 12. O-O-O Qe7 13. h4 Bd7








   
14. f3
14. exf5!? deserves attention, 14...gxf5 15. Nb5! Kd8! 16. c5 dxc5 17. d6 cxd6 18. Nxd6 Nxd6 19. Qxd6 Qxd6 20. Rxd6 Kc7 21. Rhd1 Bc6 22. Rg6 Rh7 23. Bxc5, with a small edge to White in the endgame.
14...Bh6 15. Kb1 b6
15...a6 is also playable.
16. Ka1
Or 16. Bxh6 Nxh6 17. Nb5 Qd8 (17...Kd8? 18. c5! bxc5 19. Nxc7!) 18. Bd3 a6 19. Nc3 Qe7, with counterplay.
16...Bxe3 17. Qxe3 Qf6!
This is more precise than 17...O-O-O 18. b4 Kb8 19. c5 f4! 20. gxf4 exf4 21. cxd6 Qxd6 22. Qd4 Ne5.
18. exf5
Or 18. Nb5 Kd8 19. Rhg1 Kc8, with counterplay.
18...gxf5 19. Nb5








   
19...Kd8!
A strong manoeuvre.
20. f4
Or 20. Qa3 a6 21. f4 Kc8 22. fxe5 Nxe5 23. Nd4 Kb7, with counterplay.
20...a6 21. Na3 Kc8 22. Rc1 Kb7
Black ends the development and has good counterplay.
23. Bf3?!
23. Qc3 is correct.
23...Rae8
23...Rag8 is also playable, with pressure on the kingside.
24. Qb3








   
24...Ka7!
Ju Wenjun completes the beautiful king manoeuvre ...Kd8-c8-b7-a7. The king is safe.
25. Nc2?!
25. Rcf1 is more precise.
25...exf4
After 25...Qh6! 26. Qe3 exf4 27. Qxf4 Ne5 28. Qxh6 Rxh6 Black has a small advantage in the ending.
26. gxf4 Nh6 27. Bxh5?!
White grabs the pawn. 27. Qd3 is better, 27...Ng4 28. Qd2 Re7 29. Rce1, with counterplay.









   
27...Re4!
Black takes the initiative.
28. Nb4?
A mistake. After 28. Qc3 Qxc3 29. bxc3 Rxf4 30. Be2 Black has a small advantage.
28...Ng4!
Here White must take the knight, so Black gets the nice passed g-pawn.
29. Bxg4 fxg4 30. h5 Rxf4 31. Qa3 a5 32. Nc6+ Bxc6 33. dxc6








   
33...Rf3!
Logical. Black intends ...g3-g2, winning.
34. Qa4 g3!
The pawn decides the game. The game decides the tournament.
35. Qd1 g2 36. Rg1 Rf2 37. Rb1 Qf5 38. Qd4 Rxh5 39. Qg7 Rh7 40. Qg8 Rf1 41. Qxh7 Rxb1+
White resigned. 0-1










Move
   

Harika, Dronavalli (2521) - Ju, Wenjun (2559) [A42]
Chess Women's Grand Prix/Sharjah (9) 2014

1. d4 d6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 Nc6 5. Be3 e5 6. d5 Nd4 7. Nge2 Nxe2 8. Bxe2 h5 9. Qd2 Nh6 10. h3 f5 11. g3 Nf7 12. O-O-O Qe7 13. h4 Bd7 14. f3 Bh6 15. Kb1 b6 16. Ka1 Bxe3 17. Qxe3 Qf6 18. exf5 gxf5 19. Nb5 Kd8 20. f4 a6 21. Na3 Kc8 22. Rc1 Kb7 23. Bf3 Rae8 24. Qb3 Ka7 25. Nc2 exf4 26. gxf4 Nh6 27. Bxh5 Re4 28. Nb4 Ng4 29. Bxg4 fxg4 30. h5 Rxf4 31. Qa3 a5 32. Nc6+ Bxc6 33. dxc6 Rf3 34. Qa4 g3 35. Qd1 g2 36. Rg1 Rf2 37. Rb1 Qf5 38. Qd4 Rxh5 39. Qg7 Rh7 40. Qg8 Rf1 41. Qxh7 Rxb1+ 0-1


Harika Dronavalli against Ju Wenjun. Photo by Anastasiya Karlovich
Harika Dronavalli versus Ju Wenjun, Round 9, Chess Women's Grand Prix, Sharjah 2014. Photo by Anastasiya Karlovich

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© 2014 Boris Schipkov