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Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 3: World Chess Championship, New York 2016









Move
   

Carlsen, Magnus (2853) - Karjakin, Sergey (2772) [C67]
World Chess Championship/New York (3) 2016

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 The Spanish Game, Berlin Variation. 4. O-O Nxe4 5. Re1 Nd6 6. Nxe5 Be7 7. Bf1 Nxe5 8. Rxe5 O-O 9. d4 Bf6 10. Re2 A rare move, usually White plays 10.Re1, e.g. Carlsen-Anand, Chennai (8) 2013. b6 11. Re1 Re8 A novelty, 11...Nb7 was in Kasimdzhanov-Melkumyan, Bundesliga 2016. 12. Bf4 Rxe1 13. Qxe1 Qe7 14. Nc3 Bb7 15. Qxe7 Bxe7 Magnus has a slight advantage in this endgame. 16. a4 a6 17. g3?! A strange move. 17. Bd3 is better. g5! Sergey equalizes. 18. Bxd6 Bxd6 19. Bg2 Bxg2 20. Kxg2 f5= With equality. 21. Nd5 Kf7 22. Ne3 Kf6 23. Nc4 Bf8 24. Re1 Rd8 25. f4 gxf4 26. gxf4 b5 27. axb5 axb5 28. Ne3 c6 29. Kf3! Ra8 30. Rg1! White activates the rook. Ra2 30...Bh6!? deserves attention. 31. b3 c5?! 31...Ke6 is more precise. 32. Rg8 Kf7 33. Rg2+/= White has a small edge, because can gather pawns. cxd4 34. Nxf5 d3 35. cxd3 Now White has an extra pawn. Ra1 36. Nd4 b4 37. Rg5 Rb1 38. Rf5+ Ke8 39. Rb5 Rf1+? A mistake. 39...Rh1 is better. 40. Ke4 Re1+ 41. Kf5+/- White obtains a clear advantage: the king is in the centre, the passed f4-pawn. Rd1 42. Re5+?! Here 42. Rb8+ is more precise. Kf7?! 42...Kd8 is more stubborn. 43. Rd5+/- Rxd3 44. Rxd7+?! 44. Ke4 is better. Ke8 45. Rd5 Rh3 46. Re5+ Kf7 47. Re2+/= Bg7 48. Nc6 Rh5+ 49. Kg4 Rc5 50. Nd8+ Kg6 51. Ne6 h5+ 52. Kf3 Rc3+ 53. Ke4 Bf6 54. Re3 h4?! Black must continue 54...Rc2. 55. h3?! White must play 55. Nf8+! Kf7 56. Nd7, with a clear edge. Rc1 56. Nf8+ Kf7 57. Nd7 Ke6 58. Nb6 Rd1 59. f5+ Kf7 60. Nc4 Rd4+ 61. Kf3 Bg5 Black can choose 61...Kg7=, with more or less equal play. 62. Re4 Rd3+ 63. Kg4 Rg3+ 64. Kh5 Be7? An error. 64...Kf8 is stronger. 65. Ne5+ Kf6 66. Ng4+ Kf7 67. Re6 Rxh3 68. Ne5+ Kg7 69. Rxe7+ White grabs a knight. Kf6 70. Nc6? A mistake. 70. Re8! is better, 70...Kxf5 71. Nc6, and White wins. Kxf5? A mistake. Black must play 70...Rc3! 71. Re6+ Kxf5 72. Nd4+ Kf4 73. Kxh4 Rd3 74. Ne2+ Kf3 75. Nc1 Rd1 76. Rc6 Ke3 77. Rc2 Rd2, and White cannot defend the last pawn, this is a draw: a rook and a knight vs a rook, without pawns. 71. Na5 White could have won also with 71. Re1. Rh1 72. Rb7? Again a mistake. Now White could have won with 72. Rf7+! Ke6 73. Rf2. Ra1! A nice move, and Black draws. 73. Rb5+ Or 73. Nc4 h3 74. Rf7+ Ke4 75. Rf2 Kd4, with equality. Kf4 74. Rxb4+ Kg3 75. Rg4+ Kf2 76. Nc4 h3= A draw, because White must watch the passed h3-pawn. 77. Rh4 Kg3 78. Rg4+ Kf2 1/2-1/2


World Chess Championship 2016 match Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin

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