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Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin, Game 10: World Chess Championship, New York 2016









Move
   

Carlsen, Magnus (2853) - Karjakin, Sergey (2772) [C65]
World Chess Championship/New York (10) 2016

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6The Spanish Game, Berlin Variation. 4. d3 Bc5 5. c3 O-O 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bh4 Be7 8. O-O d6 9. Nbd2 Nh5 10. Bxe7 A novelty. In the game Fedorchuk-Delorme, Paris-ch blitz 2011 White played 10. Bg3. Qxe7 11. Nc4 Nf4 12. Ne3 Qf6 13. g3 Nh3+ 14. Kh1 Ne7 15. Bc4 c6 16. Bb3 Ng6 17. Qe2 a5 18. a4 Be6 19. Bxe6 fxe6 20. Nd2 d5?! A dubious move. Black must play 20...Nxf2+! 21. Kg2 and sacrifice the knight with 21...Nh4+! 22. Kg1 (22. gxh4? Qg6+ 23. Ng4 Nxg4 24. Kh1 Qh5) 22...Nh3+ 23. Kh1 Nf2+ or 23...Qf2 24. Rxf2 Nxf2+ 25. Kg1 Nh3+ with perpetual check. 21. Qh5 Ng5?! Again a bad continuation. Again 21...Nxf2+! is better, 22. Kg2 Qf7 23. Qe2 Nh4+ with a draw by perpetual check. 22. h4 22. Rae1 is also interesting, with pressure on the black pawns in the centre. Nf3 23. Nxf3 Qxf3+ 24. Qxf3 Rxf3 25. Kg2+/= Magnus has a small advantage in the endgame, because Black's pawns are weak. Rf7 26. Rfe1 26. Rae1!? is playable too. h5 26...Raf8!? deserves attention. 27. Nf1 Kf8 28. Nd2+/= Ke7 29. Re2 Kd6 30. Nf3 Raf8 31. Ng5 Re7 32. Rae1 Rfe8 33. Nf3 Nh8 34. d4 exd4 35. Nxd4 g6 36. Re3 Nf7 37. e5+ Kd7 38. Rf3 Nh6?! Black could try 38...c5!?. 39. Rf6 Rg7 40. b4! White attacks on the queenside. axb4 41. cxb4 Ng8 42. Rf3 Nh6 43. a5 Nf5 44. Nb3 Kc7 45. Nc5 Kb8 46. Rb1 Ka7 47. Rd3 Rc7 48. Ra3 Nd4 49. Rd1 Nf5 50. Kh3 Nh6 51. f3 Rf7 52. Rd4 Nf5 53. Rd2 Rh7 54. Rb3 Ree7 55. Rdd3 White can continue 55. b5!? cxb5 56. Rxb5 Ne3 57. Rdb2 Nc4 58. R2b3 Nd2 59. R3b4 Nc4 (59...Nxf3 60. a6) 60. f4, with a clear edge. Rh8 56. Rb1 Rhh7? A mistake. 56...Nh6!? is more stubborn. 57. b5! cxb5 58. Rxb5 d4 59. Rb6 Rc7 60. Nxe6 Rc3 61. Nf4 Rhc7 62. Nd5 White can win with 62. Rxg6 Rxd3 63. Nxd3 Rc3 64. Rf6 Ne3 65. Nf4 Rc1 66. g4. Rxd3 63. Nxc7 Kb8 64. Nb5 Kc8 65. Rxg6 Rxf3 66. Kg2 Rb3 67. Nd6+ Nxd6 68. Rxd6 Re3 Or 68...Kc7 69. Rxd4 Rb5 70. e6 Rxa5 71. e7 Re5 72. Rd5 Rxe7 73. Rxh5, winning. 69. e6 Kc7 70. Rxd4 Rxe6 71. Rd5+- White wins, because grabs and h5-pawn. Rh6 72. Kf3 Kb8 73. Kf4 Ka7 74. Kg5 Rh8 75. Kf6 1-0


World Chess Championship 2016 match Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin

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