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Carlsen, Magnus (2872) - Grischuk, Alexander (2764) [C65]
Candidates 2013, London (4) 2013

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5
The Spanish Game.
3...Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. c3 O-O 6. O-O d6 7. h3 a6 8. Bxc6 bxc6








   
9. Re1!?
Another plan is 9. d4. Then interesting is 9...Bb6!? 10. Re1 h6 11. dxe5 dxe5 12. Qxd8 Rxd8 13. Na3 Nd7 14. Nc4 f6 15. Rd1 Re8 (15...Bb7) 16. Ne1 Nc5 17. f3 Ba7 (17...Be6) 18. Be3 Be6 19. Na5 Bb6! 20. Nxc6 (20. Bxc5 Bxc5+ 21. Kh1 Bb6 22. Nxc6 a5 23. Nc2 Bc4 24. b4 axb4 25. N6xb4 Ra5=) 20...Na4= 21. Bxb6 cxb6 22. b3, 1/2 a draw in Yu Yangyi - So, W, Reykjavik open 2013. Or 11. Qc2 Re8 12. Nbd2 exd4 13. cxd4 c5?! (13...Bb7=) 14. d5 c6 (14...Bb7) 15. dxc6 Qc7 16. b3 (16. Nc4!?) 16...Qxc6 17. Bb2 Bd8 18. e5 dxe5 19. Nxe5 Qc7 20. Ndc4, with a small edge in Karjakin, S - Grischuk, A, Moscow 2013. Or 10. Re1 exd4 11. cxd4 d5 (11...h6) 12. e5 Ne4 13. Be3 f6?! (13...f5!?) 14. Nbd2?! (14. Nc3 f5 15. Ne2, with a small edge) 14...f5, with equality in Karjakin, S - Jakovenko, D, Moscow 2012.
9...Re8 10. Nbd2








   
10...d5!?
Black counterattacks in the centre at once. After 10...Bb6 11. Nf1 h6 12. Ng3 Be6 (12...Rb8!?) White trades dark-squared bishops 13. Be3! Bxe3?! (13...a5) 14. Rxe3 c5 15. Qc2 Nd7?! (15...Rb8) 16. d4! cxd4 17. cxd4 exd4 18. Nxd4, and White had the better chances in Svidler, P - Navara, D, Prague 2012. Or 11...Nd7 12. d4 Qe7 13. Ng3 Nf8 14. Be3 (14. dxe5!?) 14...Rb8 15. Kh1 Ng6 16. Qc2 f6 17. c4 exd4 18. Bxd4?! (18. Nxd4) 18...Bxd4 19. Nxd4, Navara, D - Andersen, M, Reykjavik open 2013, and Black can obtain some advantage with 19...Qe5! 20. Nxc6 Qxb2. Deserving attention is 10...a5!? 11. Nf1 h6 12. Be3 Bxe3 13. Rxe3 Rb8 14. Qc2 Nh5 (14...c5) 15. d4 Nf4 16. Ng3 Qf6 17. dxe5 dxe5, with counterplay in Malinovsky, K - Sosna, J, Czech Republic 2013.
11. exd5
White could try 11. d4 and 11. Qc2.
11...Qxd5 12. Nb3
After 12. Qc2 Bf8 and 12. Qe2 Bb7 Black has counterplay.
12...Bf8! 13. c4! Qd6 14. Be3
Black equalizes in the case of 14. d4 e4 15. Ne5 Qe6 16. c5 Qd5 17. Be3 a5 18. Rc1 a4 19. Nd2 Ba6.
14...Nd7 15. d4








   
15...e4!
An excellent response. Worse is 15...exd4 16. Qxd4 Qxd4 17. Nfxd4 c5 18. Nc6 Re6 19. Nca5 Bd6 20. Nc1 h6 21. Nd3, with a nice endgame for White.
16. Nfd2 a5!
Prima facie it seems that White has a small advantage due to the ugly pawn structure of Black on the queenside. But then we see that Black has good counterplay on the kingside and in the centre and can use the b-file, and the chances are equal.
17. a4








   
17...f5?!
17...Qg6! is more precise, and after 18. Qg4 (18. Bf4 Bd6) 18...Ne5 19. Qxg6 Nxg6 Black has no problems.
18. c5 Qg6?!
Here 18...Qe6! is better, 19. Qc1 (19. Bf4 Nf6 20. Bxc7 Qf7 21. Be5 Be7 22. Qc2 Be6, with compensation) 19...Be7 20. Nc4 Nf6, with counterplay, and if White takes the pawn 21. Nbxa5, then Black places his knight in the centre and activates the dark-squared bishop after 21...Nd5 22. Bf4 Bf6, with good compensation for the sacrificed pawn.
19. Nc4!
Now White activates his pieces and gets a pleasant edge.
19...Nf6








   
20. Bf4
20. Ne5?! is dangerous for White, because Black sacrifices the exchange with 20...Rxe5! 21. dxe5 Nd5, and obtains real compensation, threatening to storm on the kingside with ...f5-f4. But White can take the a5-pawn 20. Nbxa5!? Nd5 21. Qd2, with a small advantage.
20...Nd5 21. Qd2 Be6 22. Nbxa5
Magnus gladly grabs the pawn.








   
22...Reb8?
The decisive mistake. Correct is 22...Nxf4 23. Qxf4 Qf6, and White has only a small edge, 24. Qxc7 is met by 24...Rec8! 25. Qg3 Qxd4 26. Nb6 Qxc5 27. Nxc8 Qxa5 28. Nd6 Qb4.
23. Ne5 Qf6
Or 23...Qe8 24. Naxc6 Rb3 25. Bh2 Ra6 26. Qc2 Rb7 27. b4 Nxb4 28. Nxb4 Rxb4 29. d5 Bf7 30. a5.
24. Bh2!?
Also possible is 24. Naxc6 Nxf4 25. Qxf4 Rxb2 26. Qc1 Rb3 27. a5 g6 28. Rb1.
24...Rxa5
Black sacrifices the exchange to attack the white king.
25. Qxa5 Rxb2








   
26. Rab1!
An excellent move! Magnus Carlsen obtains a huge advantage.
26...Ra2 27. Qa6!
A strong defensive manoeuvre.
27...e3!? 28. fxe3 Qg5 29. Re2!








   
29...Nxe3
After 29...Rxe2 30. Qxe2 Nc3 31. Qd3 Nxb1 32. Nf3! Qd8 33. Qxb1 White wins.
30. Nf3! Qg6 31. Rxa2 Bxa2 32. Rb2 Bc4








   
33. Qa5
White can attack the black king with 33. Qc8 Bd5 34. Bxc7 Bxf3 35. Bd6 h5 36. Qxf8+ Kh7 37. Be5, winning.
33...Bd5 34. Qe1 f4
Or 34...Bxf3 35. Qxe3.
35. Bxf4








   
35...Nc2
Black has no attack, has no time. White quickly wins.
36. Qf2 Bxf3 37. Rxc2
Time. Black resigned. 1-0










Move
   

Carlsen, Magnus (2872) - Grischuk, Alexander (2764) [C65]
FIDE Candidates 2013/London (4) 2013

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. c3 O-O 6. O-O d6 7. h3 a6 8. Bxc6 bxc6 9. Re1!? Re8 10. Nbd2 d5!? 11. exd5 Qxd5 12. Nb3 Bf8! 13. c4! Qd6 14. Be3 Nd7 15. d4 e4! 16. Nfd2 a5! 17. a4 f5?! 18. c5 Qg6?! 19. Nc4!+/= Nf6 20. Bf4 Nd5 21. Qd2 Be6 22. Nbxa5 Reb8? 23. Ne5 Qf6 24. Bh2!? Rxa5!? 25. Qxa5 Rxb2 26. Rab1!+- Ra2 27. Qa6! e3!? 28. fxe3 Qg5 29. Re2! Nxe3 30. Nf3! Qg6 31. Rxa2 Bxa2 32. Rb2 Bc4 33. Qa5 Bd5 34. Qe1 f4 35. Bxf4 Nc2 36. Qf2 Bxf3 37. Rxc2 1-0


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