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Anand, Viswanathan (2804) - Carlsen, Magnus (2876) [C95]
Norway Chess, Stavanger (4) 2015

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 d6








   
7. c3
The Spanish Game or the Ruy Lopez, but not the Berlin Variation as usual. In this game Magnus Carlsen prefers to go to the Breyer Variation, there Black continues ...Nb8-Nd7, followed by ...c5. In 2010 Anand and Carlsen played the Breyer Variation 4 times, 3 games ended in draws, and Anand won 1 game in the London Classic 2010, but then Carlsen played ...c6.
7...O-O 8. Nbd2 Re8 9. Re1 b5 10. Bc2 Bf8 11. Nf1 g6 12. h3 Bb7 13. Ng3 Nb8 14. d4 Nbd7 15. a4 c5 16. d5 c4 17. Bg5 Bg7 18. Qd2








   
18...Rb8
A rare continuation. World Chess Champions Spassky and Petrosian played 18...Nc5 19. Nh2 (19. Ra3 Qc7 20. Rea1 Rab8 21. Qe3 Nfd7=, with equality in Tal,M - Petrosian, T, Milan 1975) 19...h5 20. Nf3 Qc7, with counterplay in Kuzmin, G - Spassky, B, Moscow 1973.
19. Nh2!?
A typical good knight move in such positions. White plans the strong Ng4.
19...Bc8?
Very weak. This is a mistake. Here we see that World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen did not understand this opening, his home preparation for this line was bad. Sometimes World Champion makes mistakes in openings, so he can improve his play (irony: he beat all, he won all, but must improve). White threatens Ng4, not only to pressure on f6-knight, but also with the idea to play Nh6+ to trade the nice defender, the g7-bishop. Therefore Black must react with 19...Qc7!? or 19...h5. After 19...Qc7!? Black can take the g4-knight. With 19...h5 Black prevents the knight move, but weakens his kingside.
20. Ng4! Nc5








   
21. Nh6+! Bxh6
If 21...Kf8?! then White pressures on the kingside with 22. Re3 Re7 23. Rf3 Rc7 24. axb5 axb5 25. Qe3, with a clear edge.
22. Bxh6 bxa4 23. Ra2?!
White can play 23. Be3! Rxb2 24. Bxc5 dxc5 25. Rxa4 Qb6 26. Rea1, with a small but lasting advantage, because Black's pawns are weak and White has a protected central passed pawn on d5.
23...a3! 24. bxa3 Nfd7








   
25. f4!
White intends to open the position to storm the kingside: the dark-squared h6-bishop is dangerous for the black king, and White tries to use it.
25...a5?
An error. Black must try 25...exf4! with the idea to create a knight outpost on e5 26. Qxf4 Ne5 27. Rf1 and sacrifice the exchange in Anand's style with 27...Rb3! 28. Bxb3 cxb3 29. Rd2 a5, with serious compensation and counterchances due to the powerful knights and the passed b3-pawn.
26. Rf1 f6
After 26...Qb6!? 27. Kh2 Nb3 28. Qe2 exf4 29. Bxf4 Ne5 30. Rb2 a4 31. Rbb1 White has a small advantage.









   
27. f5!
Very strong: White attacks weaknesses of Black's kingside and intends to checkmate the monarch.
27...Nd3!? 28. Bxd3 cxd3








   
29. Qd1!
Viswanathan Anand plans the manoeuvre Ra2-f2 to reinforce the attack. 29. fxg6! is also good, 29...hxg6 30. Qxd3 Qb6+ 31. Kh2 Ba6 32. c4 Kh7 33. Raf2! Qd8 (33...Kxh6 34. Qd2+ Kh7 35. Rxf6 Nxf6 36. Rxf6) 34. Bd2, with a clear edge to White.
29...Re7?!
29...Kh8!? is more precise.
30. Raf2 Rf7 31. Qxd3?!
Here White can attack at once with 31. h4! Qb6 32. Qf3 Nf8 33. fxg6 Nxg6 (33...hxg6 34. h5) 34. Kh2, with a huge edge.
31...Nc5?!
31...Rb3 is more stubborn, 32. h4 Qc7.









   
32. Qf3!
Great! Now all White's pieces are on the king's wing and can demolish the black citadel.
32...Ba6 33. Qg4
33. fxg6 is also possible, 33...hxg6 34. Qg4 Kh8 35. c4 Bxc4 36. Rc1 Nd3 37. Rxc4 Nxf2 38. Kxf2.
33...g5 34. h4!
Viswanathan Anand sacrifices the exchange to keep a tempo to attack.
34...Bxf1 35. Rxf1 Qd7 36. hxg5 fxg5








   
37. Qh5
37. Bxg5 is also good, 37...Kh8 38. Qh4 Rg8 39. Rb1, winning.
37...Kh8 38. f6! Rg8 39. Bg7+ Rfxg7 40. fxg7+ Qxg7 41. Nf5 Qg6 42. Qxg6 Rxg6 43. Ne7








   
43...Kg7?
43...Rh6 is more stubborn, 44. Rf8+ Kg7 45. Rc8! Kf7 46. Nf5 Rg6 47. Nxd6+ Rxd6 48. Rxc5, and Black cannot defend all pawns in the rook endgame, so White must win gradually.
44. Nxg6 Kxg6
White wins.
45. Rf8 a4 46. c4 h5 47. Kf2
Black resigned. 1-0










Move
   

Anand, Viswanathan (2804) - Carlsen, Magnus (2876) [C95]
Norway Chess/Stavanger (4) 2015

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 d6 7. c3 O-O 8. Nbd2 Re8 9. Re1 b5 10. Bc2 Bf8 11. Nf1 g6 12. h3 Bb7 13. Ng3 Nb8 14. d4 Nbd7 15. a4 c5 16. d5 c4 17. Bg5 Bg7 18. Qd2 Rb8 19. Nh2 Bc8 20. Ng4 Nc5 21. Nh6+ Bxh6 22. Bxh6 bxa4 23. Ra2 a3 24. bxa3 Nfd7 25. f4 a5 26. Rf1 f6 27. f5 Nd3 28. Bxd3 cxd3 29. Qd1 Re7 30. Raf2 Rf7 31. Qxd3 Nc5 32. Qf3 Ba6 33. Qg4 g5 34. h4 Bxf1 35. Rxf1 Qd7 36. hxg5 fxg5 37. Qh5 Kh8 38. f6 Rg8 39. Bg7+ Rfxg7 40. fxg7+ Qxg7 41. Nf5 Qg6 42. Qxg6 Rxg6 43. Ne7 Kg7 44. Nxg6 Kxg6 45. Rf8 a4 46. c4 h5 47. Kf2 1-0


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© 2015 Boris Schipkov