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Anand, Viswanathan (2775) - Carlsen, Magnus (2870) [E25]
World Chess Championship, Chennai (9) 2013

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4
The Nimzo-Indian Defence in India.
4. f3
A sharp line.
4...d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 c5 7. cxd5 exd5 8. e3








   
8...c4
A rare move. Usually Black plays 8...0-0, e.g. 8...O-O 9. Bd3 Qc7 10. Ne2 Re8 11. O-O Nbd7 12. Kh1 Nf8 13. Ra2 Bd7 14. g4 Re6?! (14... Ne6) 15. Ng3 (15. Nf4!?) 15...cxd4 16. cxd4 h6 17. Rg2 N6h7 18. e4! Bc6 (18...dxe4 19. fxe4 Ng6 20. Nf5) 19. e5 Ree8 20. Nf5 Ne6 21. f4 f6 and White had a powerful attack and won after 22. g5! fxg5 23. fxg5 hxg5 24. Qh5 Nhf8 25. Bxg5 1-0, Schipkov, B - Kievelitz, B, Kecskemet 1992.
9. Ne2 Nc6 10. g4








   
10...O-O
After 10...h6 11. Bg2 Na5 12. O-O Nb3 13. Ra2 O-O 14. Ng3 Bd7 15. Qe1 Re8 16. e4 dxe4 17. fxe4 Nxg4 18. Bf4, White had good compensation for the pawn in Kasparov, G - Polgar, J, Tilburg 1997.
11. Bg2 Na5 12. O-O Nb3 13. Ra2 b5 14. Ng3








   
14...a5!?
A novelty. With the idea of ...Ra6 to move the rook to the kingside or the centre or simply to defend the 6th rank. After 14...Re8 15. g5 Nd7 16. e4 Nb6 (16...Nf8) 17. Raf2 (17. e5) 17...Na4 (17...a5) 18. Qc2 Rb8 19. f4 Bb7 20. e5 a5? (20...Na1) 21. f5! Qb6 White had a strong attack with 22. e6! Nxc1 23. exf7+ Kxf7 24. g6+ Kg8 25. f6! Rf8 26. gxh7+ Kh8 27. fxg7+ Kxg7 28. Rxf8 Rxf8 29. Rxf8, 1-0 Liu, A - Wu, C, ICC INT, USA tt 2013.
Or 14...Bb7 15. g5 (15. e4! is better) 15...Nd7 16. e4 Qb6 17. Kh1 a5 18. e5 b4 19. Bb2 bxc3, 1/2, a draw in Vlaic, B - Saric, Sibenik 2011.
15. g5 Ne8 16. e4
Logical. White seizes the centre.
16...Nxc1?!
Here 16...Nc7!? and 16...Ra6!? deserve attention.
17. Qxc1 Ra6 18. e5
Now the prophylactic 18. Rb2!? is interesting, with the idea to stop the ...b5-b4 advance.
18...Nc7
Playable is 18...b4!?, with complications.
19. f4 b4








   
20. axb4?!
Better is 20. f5! b3 21. Raf2, with an attack on the kingside. In this case White keeps the second rook that can be useful as in attack as in defence, because this rook controls the b2-square.
20...axb4 21. Rxa6 Nxa6 22. f5
White plans to checkmate the rival. It is a little risky, because Black can get the protected passed pawn with 22...b3.
22...b3 23. Qf4 Nc7 24. f6 g6 25. Qh4 Ne8 26. Qh6 b2!
The best move. Magnus Carlsen plays well.
27. Rf4
Probably more precise is 27.Ne2, followed by Nf4 to attack the d5-pawn.
27...b1=Q+








   
28. Nf1?
The decisive mistake. Correct is 28.Bf1, with equality after 28. Bf1 Qd1 29. Rh4 Qh5 30. Nxh5 gxh5 31. Rxh5 Bf5 32. g6 Bxg6 33. Rg5 Nxf6 34. exf6 Qxf6 35. Rxd5.
28...Qe1
After 28...Qe1 29. Rh4 Qxh4 30. Qxh4 Qa5 Black wins thanks to an extra rook.
White resigned. 0-1










Move
   

Anand, Viswanathan (2775) - Carlsen, Magnus (2870) [E25]
World Chess Championship/Chennai (9) 2013

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. f3 d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 c5 7. cxd5 exd5 8. e3 c4 9. Ne2 Nc6 10. g4 O-O 11. Bg2 Na5 12. O-O Nb3 13. Ra2 b5 14. Ng3 a5 15. g5 Ne8 16. e4 Nxc1 17. Qxc1 Ra6 18. e5 Nc7 19. f4 b4 20. axb4 axb4 21. Rxa6 Nxa6 22. f5 b3 23. Qf4 Nc7 24. f6 g6 25. Qh4 Ne8 26. Qh6 b2 27. Rf4 b1=Q+ 28. Nf1 Qe1 0-1


Game 9 Anand - Carlsen live with commentary and analysis by Boris Schipkov

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© 2013 Boris Schipkov