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Carlsen, Magnus (2870) - Anand, Viswanathan (2775) [C67]
World Chess Championship, Chennai (8) 2013

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. e4
Magnus Carlsen played 1. Nf3 in games one and three, then 1. c4 in game five.
1...e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6
The Berlin Variation of the Ruy Lopez.
4. O-O Nxe4 5. Re1
The main line is 5.d4, as Anand played in game 4 with the white pieces. After the game at the press conference Viswanathan Anand said about the 5.Re1 line: "Generally a fairly solid system for White. Not entirely without chances if Black plays inaccurately". Magnus Carlsen said: "He played the Berlin. I played the most solid line".
5...Nd6 6. Nxe5 Be7 7. Bf1 Nxe5 8. Rxe5 O-O 9. d4








   
9...Bf6
Carlsen used 9...Ne8 two times in 2013: 9...Ne8 10. d5 d6 (10...Bc5 11. Re1 d6 12. Nc3 Bf5 13. Bd3 Bxd3 14. Qxd3 Nf6 15. Na4 Re8 16. Bd2 Rxe1+ 17. Rxe1 Qd7 18. Nxc5 dxc5 19. c4 Re8, with a slight edge to White in Karjakin, S - Carlsen, M, Moscow 2013) 11. Re1 Bg5 12. Nc3 Bxc1 13. Rxc1 Nf6 14. Qd4 Bd7 15. Ne4 Re8 16. Nxf6+ Qxf6 17. Qxf6 gxf6, and White had a small advantage in Leko, P - Carlsen, M, Wijk aan Zee 2013.
10. Re1








   
10...Re8!
A good continuation. White had a small advantage after 10...Nf5 11. d5 d6 12. Nd2 Bg5 (12...Nh4 13. g3 Ng6 14. a4 Ne5 15. Ra3 a5 16. Ne4 Be7, Anand, V - McShane, L, London 2010) 13. c3 Bd7 14. g3 Re8 15. Ne4 Bxc1 16. Rxc1 Nh6 17. f3 Nf5 (17...f5!?) 18. Qd2 c6 19. dxc6 bxc6 20. Qf2 Be6 21. Rcd1 d5 22. Nc5, Carlsen, M - Cheparinov, I, Wijk aan Zee 2006.
11. c3 Rxe1 12. Qxe1 Ne8 13. Bf4 d5 14. Bd3 g6
Garry Kasparov wrote on Twitter about Magnus Carlsen and the match: "Question is will he finish pragmatically like Karpov or like Fischer the maximalist?"
15. Nd2 Ng7 16. Qe2 c6








   
17. Re1!?
A novelty. White controls the only open file. Black had an equal game after 17. Nb3 b6 18. Re1 Bf5 19. Bxf5 Nxf5 20. Nc1 Qd7 21. Nd3 Ng7 22. Be5 Re8, Nepomniachtchi, I - Riazantsev, A, Khanty-Mansiysk 2011, and after 17. Be5 Bxe5 18. Qxe5 Bf5 19. Bxf5 Nxf5 20. Re1 Qd6 21. Nb3 Qxe5 22. Rxe5 f6 23. Re2 Kf7, Rozentalis, E - Bruzon Batista, L, Montreal 2013.
17...Bf5 18. Bxf5 Nxf5 19. Nf3 Ng7 20. Be5
Magnus wants quickly to finish the game in a draw. Pragmatic!
Ne6 21. Bxf6 Qxf6 22. Ne5








   
22...Re8!
With equality.
23. Ng4
Magnus Carlsen: "With the line I chose there was not too much to think about. The moves very much suggest themself. It has been played before. There wasn't too much to think about. I wasn't in any mood to think either".
23...Qd8 24. Qe5 Ng7








   
25. Qxe8+!
A nice move: almost a queen sacrifice. Magnus Carlsen: "I did not have a particular bible in chess when I was young. As a young player I was trying to play attacking chess sacrificing material all the time. A bit different from what I do today. Although I am playing the game for a long time I have been playing top level for seven years. I have had some time to adjust to the situation and adjust to the other players and develop my play".
25...Nxe8 26. Rxe8+ Qxe8 27. Nf6+ Kf8 28. Nxe8 Kxe8 29. f4 f5








   
30. Kf2
White can create the symmetry of pawns with 30. g3.
30...b5
The king and pawn endgame is drawn.
31. b4 Kf7 32. h3 h6 33. h4 h5
Here White can continue 34. g3 with the symmetry of pawns and kings.
A draw. 1/2-1/2










Move
   

Carlsen, Magnus (2870) - Anand, Viswanathan (2775) [C67]
World Chess Championship/Chennai (8) 2013

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. Re1 Nd6 6. Nxe5 Be7 7. Bf1 Nxe5 8. Rxe5 O-O 9. d4 Bf6 10. Re1 Re8 11. c3 Rxe1 12. Qxe1 Ne8 13. Bf4 d5 14. Bd3 g6 15. Nd2 Ng7 16. Qe2 c6 17. Re1 Bf5 18. Bxf5 Nxf5 19. Nf3 Ng7 20. Be5 Ne6 21. Bxf6 Qxf6 22. Ne5 Re8 23. Ng4 Qd8 24. Qe5 Ng7 25. Qxe8+ Nxe8 26. Rxe8+ Qxe8 27. Nf6+ Kf8 28. Nxe8 Kxe8 29. f4 f5 30. Kf2 b5 31. b4 Kf7 32. h3 h6 33. h4 h5 1/2-1/2


Game 8 Carlsen - Anand live with commentary and analysis by Boris Schipkov

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© 2013 Boris Schipkov