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Anand, Viswanathan (2775) - Carlsen, Magnus (2870) [C65]
World Chess Championship, Chennai (6) 2013

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5
The Spanish Game or the Ruy Lopez.
Nf6 4. d3
In game 4 Viswanathan Anand played 4.0-0. Now he avoids the Berlin Defence endgame.
4...Bc5 5. c3 O-O 6. O-O Re8 7. Re1 a6 8. Ba4 b5 9. Bb3 d6








   
10. Bg5
A novelty. Viswanathan Anand played 10. Nbd2 against Levon Aronian in the Alekhine Memorial, Paris 2013: 10. Nbd2 Bb6 11. Nf1 Ne7 12. Ng3 Ng6 13. h3 h6 14. d4 c5 15. dxe5 dxe5 16. Qxd8 Bxd8, with equality.
10...Be6
The alternative is 10...h6.
11. Nbd2 h6 12. Bh4 Bxb3 13. axb3 Nb8!?
Black intends the manoeuvre ...Nb8-Nd7 to defend the f6-knight, followed by ...Qe7-e6.








   
14. h3
14. b4!? and 14. d4!? deserve attention.
14...Nbd7 15. Nh2 Qe7 16. Ndf1 Bb6 17. Ne3 Qe6 18. b4








   
18...a5!
Black trades his weak pawn.
19. bxa5 Bxa5
The game is equal.
20. Nhg4 Bb6 21. Bxf6 Nxf6 22. Nxf6+ Qxf6 23. Qg4
White can defend the knight and f2-square with 23. Qe2!?.








   
23...Bxe3!
A good idea. Black weakens a little White's pawn structure.
24. fxe3 Qe7 25. Rf1 c5 26. Kh2 c4!?
Black tries to get the initiative.
27. d4!? Rxa1 28. Rxa1 Qb7








   
29. Rd1
Simpler is 29.d5, with equality.
29...Qc6 30. Qf5 exd4 31. Rxd4 Re5 32. Qf3 Qc7 33. Kh1 Qe7
Here Black has a slight advantage, because he can pressure on the doubled central pawns.
34. Qg4 Kh7 35. Qf4 g6 36. Kh2 Kg7 37. Qf3 Re6








   
38. Qg3?!
White can play 38.Kg1 or 38.Kh1, keeping pawns.
38...Rxe4 39. Qxd6 Rxe3 40. Qxe7 Rxe7
Black has an extra pawn in the rook endgame. After the game at the press conference Magnus Carlsen said: "He sacrificed or blundered a pawn. After that I got a good rook ending. I am not at all sure if it is winning".
41. Rd5 Rb7
This is a draw, if White will play without mistakes.
42. Rd6 f6 43. h4 Kf7
Carlsen said: "At this point I missed the whole h5 idea. I didn't think you can really give up a pawn like that. May be I should play 43...h5 (instead of 43...Kf7) and press for a win eventually with ...Re7-e5".








   
44. h5!
Carlsen: "Now, it was a draw. I had one little trap. Which was my Kf4-Ke3 etc. Fortunately he went for it".
44...gxh5 45. Rd5 Kg6 46. Kg3 Rb6 47. Rc5 f5 48. Kh4 Re6 49. Rxb5 Re4+ 50. Kh3
Interesting is 50. Kg3.
50...Kg5








   
51. Rb8
Hikaru Nakamura wrote on Twitter: "... a theoretical draw... 51.b3 Re3 52.Kh2 Rxc3 53.bxc4 =".
51...h4 52. Rg8+ Kh5 53. Rf8 Rf4 54. Rc8 Rg4 55. Rf8 Rg3+ 56. Kh2 Kg5








   
57. Rg8+
After the game at the press conference Viswanathan Anand said: "Magnus pretty much summed it up well. It is here that I gave this check (57.Rg8+) and I thought it will go Rg4 and similar idea. But I just blundered into f4. And here 57.Rc8 is just a draw".
57...Kf4 58. Rc8 Ke3 59. Rxc4 f4
Carlsen: "Without the pawns on b2 and c3 it will be a dead draw. His pawns seriously inhibit the rook and ...h3...f3 is coming very fast".








   
60. Ra4?
The decisive mistake. Better is the logical 60.b4!, White simply pushes his passed pawn according to general principles of chess, 60. b4 h3 61. gxh3 Rg6 (61...Rg5 62. Rc6 f3 63. Re6+ Kf2 64. Rxh6=) 62. Rc8 f3 63. Re8+ Kd3 (63...Kd2 64. b5=, or 63...Kf2 64. b5=) 64. b5 f2 65. Rf8 Ke2 66. Re8+, and the endgame is drawn.
60...h3 61. gxh3 Rg6!
The winning move.
62. c4








   
62...f3
The passed pawn is unstoppable. Viswanathan Anand: "Today was a heavy blow. I will not pretend otherwise. Nothing to be done. You just go on".
63. Ra3+ Ke2 64. b4 f2 65. Ra2+ Kf3 66. Ra3+ Kf4 67. Ra8 Rg1
White resigned. 0-1










Move
   

Anand, Viswanathan (2775) - Carlsen, Magnus (2870) [C65]
World Chess Championship/Chennai (6) 2013

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. c3 O-O 6. O-O Re8 7. Re1 a6 8. Ba4 b5 9. Bb3 d6 10. Bg5 Be6 11. Nbd2 h6 12. Bh4 Bxb3 13. axb3 Nb8 14. h3 Nbd7 15. Nh2 Qe7 16. Ndf1 Bb6 17. Ne3 Qe6 18. b4 a5 19. bxa5 Bxa5 20. Nhg4 Bb6 21. Bxf6 Nxf6 22. Nxf6+ Qxf6 23. Qg4 Bxe3 24. fxe3 Qe7 25. Rf1 c5 26. Kh2 c4 27. d4 Rxa1 28. Rxa1 Qb7 29. Rd1 Qc6 30. Qf5 exd4 31. Rxd4 Re5 32. Qf3 Qc7 33. Kh1 Qe7 34. Qg4 Kh7 35. Qf4 g6 36. Kh2 Kg7 37. Qf3 Re6 38. Qg3 Rxe4 39. Qxd6 Rxe3 40. Qxe7 Rxe7 41. Rd5 Rb7 42. Rd6 f6 43. h4 Kf7 44. h5 gxh5 45. Rd5 Kg6 46. Kg3 Rb6 47. Rc5 f5 48. Kh4 Re6 49. Rxb5 Re4+ 50. Kh3 Kg5 51. Rb8 h4 52. Rg8+ Kh5 53. Rf8 Rf4 54. Rc8 Rg4 55. Rf8 Rg3+ 56. Kh2 Kg5 57. Rg8+ Kf4 58. Rc8 Ke3 59. Rxc4 f4 60. Ra4 h3 61. gxh3 Rg6 62. c4 f3 63. Ra3+ Ke2 64. b4 f2 65. Ra2+ Kf3 66. Ra3+ Kf4 67. Ra8 Rg1 0-1


Game 6 Anand - Carlsen live with commentary and analysis by Boris Schipkov

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© 2013 Boris Schipkov