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Anand, Viswanathan (2791) - Gelfand, Boris (2727) [E60]
World Championship, Moscow (8) 2012

Notes by Boris Schipkov

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. f3 c5
Boris Gelfand played 3...d5 in game 3.
4. d5 d6 5. e4 Bg7








   
6. Ne2!?
A fresh wind. The theoretic lines of the King's Indian Saemisch System can arise after 6.Nc3.
6...O-O 7. Nec3
This move leads to unexplored lands.
7...Nh5
A novelty. Both rivals try to surprise each other.








   
8. Bg5
An interesting continuation, White's idea is to stop the pawn advance ...e7-e6. The simple 8. g4 also deserves serious attention, and in the near future White can attack on the kingside.
8...Bf6
If 8...h6 then 9. Be3 followed by Qd2.
9. Bxf6 exf6 10. Qd2
10. g4 is playable.
10...f5
This is the idea of the move 9...exf6.
11. exf5 Bxf5 12. g4!
The strongest move.
12...Re8+








   
13. Kd1!
White's plan with the blow 12. g4! and the manoeuvre Kd1-c2! is best in such types of positions of the King's Indian Saemisch. The games in the Saemisch System of the King's Indian Anand, Viswanathan - Grischuk, Alexander, Linares 2009 and Anand, Viswanathan - Nakamura, Hikaru, Moscow Tal Memorial 2011 ended in a draw. Now in the decisive moment of the World Championship match 2012 Viswanathan Anand displays the great positional understanding of the King's Indian Saemisch structures and wins.
13...Bxb1 14. Rxb1 Qf6?
An error. But in the case of 14...Nf6 15. Kc2 Nbd7 16. Be2 Re7 White has a preferable position and can attack with 17. h4.
15. gxh5 Qxf3+ 16. Kc2 Qxh1








   
17. Qf2!
Threatening to trap Black's queen. After 17...Nc6 18. dxc6 Qxc6 19. Bd3 Re5 20. Rf1 Qc7 21. Nd5 Rxd5 22. cxd5 c4 23. Be2 White wins.
Black resigned. 1-0










Move
   

Anand, Viswanathan (2791) - Gelfand, Boris (2727) [E60]
World Championship/Moscow (8) 2012

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. f3 c5 4. d5 d6 5. e4 Bg7 6. Ne2!? A fresh continuation. The theoretic lines of the King's Indian Saemisch System can arise after 6.Nc3. O-O 7. Nec3 This move leads to unexplored lands. Nh5 A novelty. Both rivals try to surprise each other. 8. Bg5 An interesting continuation. Bf6 9. Bxf6 exf6 10. Qd2 f5 11. exf5 Bxf5 12. g4! The strongest move. Re8+ 13. Kd1! The best manoeuvre. White intends Kc2 and the king is safe. Viswanathan Anand displays the great positional understanding of the King's Indian Saemisch structures. Bxb1 14. Rxb1 Qf6? An error. 15. gxh5 Qxf3+ 16. Kc2 Qxh1 17. Qf2! Threatening to trap Black's queen. After 17...Nc6 18. dxc6 Qxc6 19. Bd3 Re5 20. Rf1 White wins. 1-0


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